What If Aaron Sorkin’s “The Newsroom” Were Set In China?

Chinese Newsroom
By TAR Nation and RFH Ed's note: TAR and RFH have diametrically opposed opinions about Aaron Sorkin's The Newsroom, starring Jeff Daniels as a news anchor who, in one lapse of honesty, sees his world turned upside-down. Characters sing "arias of facts," as the New Yorker's review put it, which sounds a lot like what news organizations closer to home -- in China -- do. So, TAR and RFH set aside their disagreements about The Newsroom to write a pitch for a show called Chinese Newsroom. TV producers out there: pick this up!

Xinhua Announces: Bo Xilai’s Criminal Charges, Leadership Transition Set For Nov. 8

Xi Jinping and Bo Xilai
Two huge announcements from Xinhua this evening — concerning two men who are more or less intricately tied – impeccably timed for just the moment when everyone’s preparing to start their holiday and stop caring about news. First: Bo Xilai has been expelled from the Communist Party of China (CPC) and his public office, according to a decision made at... Read more »

Ain’t No Sunshine When Xi’s Gone: The Quest To Find China’s Future President

Is Xi Jinping in Paradise City?
Presumptive Chinese president Xi Jinping has gone missing. He cancelled high-level meetings with Hillary Clinton and Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong last week, and HOLY CRAP FREAK OFF PANTS OFF. Normally rational media organizations such as the Associated bleepin’ Press have published sentences such as, “More dramatically, the U.S.-based website Boxun.com cited an unidentified source inside Zhongnanhai as saying... Read more »

Attention Overseas Foreigners: You’re Eligible To Win Something By Filling Out This Survey About The CPC’s National Congress

CPC survey
Last month we brought you a draft version of a rather incredible survey called the “Questionaire on the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC)” [sic]. We were told that “exquisite prizes will be presented to 3000 winners selected out of the overseas participants,” which seemed absurd. Were they expecting 10,000 respondents? Even so,... Read more »

Oops! Xinhua: “New Round Of Downfall To Hit Beijing” – Perhaps They Mean The Mayor And Deputy Mayor’s Resignation?

Xinhua headline
Our favorite government mouthpiece has flubbed again with the headline on its latest story (four-plus hours after its posting, it has yet to be changed). Ostensibly about a new round of rainstorms scheduled to hit this afternoon, Xinhua inadvertently draws our attention to the waves of negative reaction to the municipal government’s disaster response, a sampling... Read more »

US Transportation Secretary On Why America Doesn’t Have China’s High-Speed Rails: Republicans

Drawing by Timothy Lyster, 5th grader, Sam Houston Elementary
This lead by Foreign Policy’s Josh Rogin is pretty much the perfect example of an online magazine lead: Echoing the laments of pundits like Thomas Friedman of the New York Times, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood argued Saturday that China outpaces the United States in building major transportation infrastructure like high-speed rail because of its authoritarian system and... Read more »

Watch: Hu Jintao Heckler Forcibly Removed From Premises

Hu Jintao Heckler Forcibly Removed From Premises featured image
Chinese president Hu Jintao was in Hong Kong over the weekend as part of the 15th-year anniversary celebration of Hong Kong's handover from the UK. Yesterday, he dropped by the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center to swear in the somewhat unpopular Leung Chun-ying as new chief executive, but before he could, a demonstrator tried to interrupt his speech with pro-democracy slogans such as, "Vindicate June 4 [referring to those killed near Tiananmen in 1989]" and "End one-party dictatorship, establish a democratic China." Hu, we imagine, didn't even blink -- because he never does, since he is a robot.

Chinese State Media Gushes Over Piece Of Adhesive Hu Jintao Removes From His Shoe

Hu Jintao and the national flag
Here is the perfect example of a Chinese state mouthpiece spinning cock out of bull. Attention: this piece, “President Hu picks up China’s dignity,” published on People’s Daily at 1:05 pm today. Scene: G20 Summit in Los Cabos, Mexico; as leaders walk off after their photo op, Chinese president Hu Jintao bends over to pick... Read more »

The PRC’s “Human Rights Record Of The United States In 2011” Explained

Human rights record of the US 2011 featured image
Last Friday, the State Council Information Office of the People's Republic of China published a report called The Human Rights Record of the United States in 2011. It was in response to the US State Department's Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2011, which featured information on about 200 countries, China included. China's report, published on Xinhua, et al., was about 8,000 words. We read it so you don't have to -- and brought in TAR Nation to explain what it all means.

New Political Party Mounts Democracy Challenge To CCP?

Chinese Scientist Liberal Democratic Party
By Valentina Luo It looks like someone not only watched last year’s The Founding of a Party, but actually paid attention. A group of Chinese scientists are rumored to have “founded” the Chinese Scientist Liberal Democratic Party [中国科学家自由民主党], news of which we first noticed in the Chinese edition of Epoch Times on May 1. The Epoch Times, as parlance goes, is... Read more »

Revisiting Mike Wallace’s Interview With Jiang Zemin: “Explaining Power Dilutes It” [UPDATE]

Mike Wallace’s Interview With Jiang Zemin featured image
Isaac Stone Fish over at Foreign Policy has a fitting tribute to Mike Wallace, journalist, with a post titled "Is Mike Wallace the reason Chinese leaders don't give interviews?" To Wallace, who passed away on Saturday -- and to any journalist, really -- I can't think of a better compliment. Wallace's genius was the ability to unblinkingly chastise power. Even during the aired pleasantries, Wallace looks unimpressed with Jiang [Zemin]. During minute 2 of the hour-long interview, aired days before Jiang's 2000 U.S. visit, Wallace tells Jiang "shorter answers, please. More concise" and a touch of panic breaks through Jiang's placid smile.