Spotted In Manila: “No ‘Wang-Wang’”

No Wang Wang in Manila airport 1

Overheard in the international departures line at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila: “What do you suppose ‘wang-wang’ means?”

“Don’t do what the Chinese do in lines.”

The person who took this picture, Alex O., says, “I’m curious what this means and how similar it is to the ‘pai dui’ and ‘wenming chaoyang’ campaigns here.”

If anyone knows, drop us a line.

Another look:

No Wang Wang in Manila airport 2

13 Responses to “Spotted In Manila: “No ‘Wang-Wang’””

  1. howeezy

    ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic.

    the siren goes ‘wang wang’

    Reply
  2. Sean Tierney

    According to a friend, ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the Philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic.

    Reply
  3. Jahar

    I’ve heard, from multiple sources close to me, that ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the Philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic.

    Reply
  4. Andy McFandy

    I overheard these people who said ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’. According to them the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic. Evidently car sirens there produce a “wang wang” noise.

    Reply
  5. yang

    According to an article I read on the internet, ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic. And the siren goes ‘wang wang’.

    Reply
  6. michael englishteacher

    I heard from my funny expat dfrients that ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic. And the siren goes ‘wang wang’.

    Reply
  7. RWeeReillyDoingDis

    Wait so you are saying my friend is true? He said that ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic. And the siren goes ‘wang wang’.

    Reply
  8. Deja vu

    Guys, wait, hold on, in my dream last night someone told me that ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the Philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private cars owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic.

    Reply
  9. narsfweasels

    No, actually you guys are wrong, I heard from my running-dog foreigner friend that ‘wang wang’ is a vernacular saying in the philippines that refers to ‘cutting in line’ – the saying is derived from what was once a common behavior of some private car owners who mounted sirens on their vehicles to cut-in-line during heavy traffic. And the siren goes ‘wang wang’

    Reply

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