Take The New Visa Law Quiz, Win Prizes (But Probably Not A Visa)

Beijing is My Home contest

If the Exit-Entry Administration General Corps of the Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau were to team up with China Daily to create a contest, this is exactly how it would be introduced:

The Exit-Entry Administration General Corps of the Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau has begun a “Beijing is My Home prize contest in collaboration with China Daily as part of a campaign to promote the Exit-Entry Administration Law of the People’s Republic of China, improve awareness of the law among Chinese and foreign residents, and create a harmonious environment in the capital city.

That’s via China Daily, where you can take the quiz. (The contest was publicized on August 28 — it runs until September 28 — but we saw it just now thanks to Gary Chodorow’s U.S. and China Visa Law Blog. Update: they’ll mail it in for you if you fill it out on their website by September 27.) You have to mail in your answer sheet, which is kind of inconvenient, but there are a lot of great* prizes — five first-place prizes, 20 second, 50 third, and 100 consolation.

*The prizes are undisclosed, so it’s possible they’re just used bar mats. 

These sort of Chinese questionaires are always fun**. Some sample questions:

1. On which date was the Exit-Entry Administration Law of the People’s Republic of China (hereinafter referred to as the law) promulgated?

2. How many articles and chapters are there in the law?

Our favorite:

3. What is the purpose of the law?

A) To maintain sovereignty and order and promote international exchanges
B) To benefit citizens and facilitate application
C) To implement the law in a standardized way and administer in accordance with law
D) To protect the lawful rights of those who exit or enter China

We’d be curious to learn if 175 people mail in answers. If not — prizes for everyone!

**“Fun”

4 Responses to “Take The New Visa Law Quiz, Win Prizes (But Probably Not A Visa)”

  1. Chinese Netizen

    I always love it when a lawless kleptocracy overuses the phrase “in accordance with law”. It hurts the feelings of the Chinese people…

    Reply
    • mike

      A-fucking-Men!! :D

      It’s a little confusing to anyone who’s spent more than 5 minutes in China, but I think it’s one of those wink wink nudge nudge kinda things. The Government is so much fun!

      Reply

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